Landsat-8

Applications: Earth resources, land surface, environmental monitoring, agriculture and forestry, disaster monitoring and assessment, ice and snow cover

Operator: NASA/USGS

Sensor Type: Optical

Highest Resolution: 15m

Widest swath width: 185km

Number of Bands/Modes: 11

Launched: 11th Feb 2013

Nationality: American

Revisit Interval: 16 days

Data and Resources

Additional Info

Name LDCM - Landsat Data Continuity Mission
Parameters Measured PAN (0.52-0.68um), COASTAL BLUE (0.43-0.45um), B (0.45-0.51um), G (0.53-0.59um), R (0.64-0.67um), NIR (0.85-0.88um), SWIR (1.57-1.65um), SWIR (2.11-2.29um), CIRRUS (1.36-1.38um), TIR (10.6-11.19um), TIR (11.5-12.51um)
Sensor Type Optical Sensor
Purpose The following are the major mission objectives: Collect and archive moderate-resolution, reflective multi-spectral image data affording seasonal coverage of the global land mass for a period of no less than five years; collect and archive moderate-resolution, thermal multi-spectral image data affording seasonal coverage of the global land mass for a period of no less than three years; ensure that LDCM data are sufficiently consistent with data from the earlier Landsat missions, in terms of acquisition geometry, calibration, coverage characteristics, spectral and spatial characteristics, output product quality, and data availability to permit studies of land cover and land use change over multi-decadal periods; distribute standard LDCM data products to users on a non-discriminatory basis and at no cost to the users.
Applications Earth resources, land surface, environmental monitoring, agriculture and forestry, disaster monitoring and assessment, ice and snow cover.
Data Cost and Access Public - Free with registration
Start Date of Collection 2013-02-11
End Date of Collection N/A
Spatial Resolution (meters) 15
Frequency of Collection {16}
Data Format GeoTIFF
Distributor contact custserv@usgs.gov
Lineage The Landsat spacecraft series evolved from an experimental program (LS-1 to LS-3) to an operational program (LS-4 and LS-5) as NASA developed and launched considerably improved spacecraft that were placed into lower orbits than the previous Landsat spacecraft and carried improved instrument suites. Following the loss of Landsat-6 during launch in 1993, Landsat-7 was placed on a fast track for launch in 1998, but was ultimately launched on 15 April 1999, providing continuity in medium resolution multi-spectral imagery.
Additional Information The Landsat spacecraft series of NASA represents the longest continuous Earth imaging program in history, starting with the launch of Landsat-1 in 1972 through Landsat-7 with the ETM+ imager (launch April 15, 1999). With the evolution of the program has come an increased emphasis on the scientific utility of the data accompanied by more stringent requirements for instrument and data characterization, calibration and validation. This trend continues with LDCM, the next mission in the Landsat sequence. The enhancements of the Landsat-7 system, e.g., more on-board calibration hardware and an image assessment system and personnel, have been retained and improved, where required, for LDCM. Aspects of the calibration requirements are spread throughout the mission, including the instrument and its characterization, the spacecraft, operations and the ground system.