Landsat-2

Applications: Earth resources, land surface, environmental monitoring, agriculture and forestry, disaster monitoring and assessment, ice and snow cover

Operator: NASA/USGS

Sensor Type: Optical

Highest Resolution: 80m

Widest swath width: 185km

Number of Bands/Modes: 11

Launched: 22nd Jan 1975, February 1982

Nationality: American

Revisit Interval: 18 days

Data and Resources

Additional Info

Name L2
Parameters Measured MSS[G (0.5-0.6um), R (0.6-0.7um), R/NIR (0.7-0.8um), NIR (0.8-1.1um)] RBV[Blue-Green (0.47-0.57um), Orange-Red (0.58-0.68um), Red-NIR (0.69-0.83)]
Sensor Type Optical Sensor
Purpose The primary mission objective was to monitor Earth resources with two imaging systems and to achieve periodic and complete coverage of the United States via multispectral, high spatial resolution images of solar radiation reflected from the Earth's surface. Secondary objectives included acquisition of multispectral images over important major land masses other than the United States, at least once per season, and the relay of data acquired by ground based platforms via the Landsat satellite to a central analysis facility to support the modelling of Earth resource oriented processes.
Applications Earth resources, land surface, environmental monitoring, agriculture and forestry, disaster monitoring and assessment, ice and snow cover.
Data Cost and Access Public - Free with registration
Start Date of Collection 1975-01-22
End Date of Collection 1982-02-25
Spatial Resolution (meters) 80
Frequency of Collection {18}
Data Format GeoTIFF
Distributor contact custserv@usgs.gov
Lineage Landsat is the pioneering US (United States) land remote sensing satellite program which has provided a continuous supply of synoptic, repetitive, multispectral data of the Earth's land surfaces since 1972. Over the years a large international user community evolved along with the Landsat series. The program opened entire new fields of research, providing insights into geologic, agricultural, and land-use surveys, and led eventually to new paths of resource exploration - in all, for a better understanding of the Earth system.
Additional Information N/A